70 Percent of the World’s Jewellery Remains Unworn

Bespoke diamond daisy earrings. Re-created in 18ct Yellow Gold.

70% of the World’s Jewellery Remains Unworn

Would it surprise you that over 70% of the World’s jewellery is unworn? So many pieces rest in jewellery boxes – rarely seeing the light of day. This is a great shame. The care and attention that goes into making most jewellery, deserves attention.

I regularly ask the question. “Why don’t you wear that ring [earrings, necklace etc.]”

There are a few reasons given in response. These are just a few of them. 

1. “It [the ring] does not fit anymore. It used to fit me 10 years ago….” (Happens to the best of us!)

2. “It’s the wrong metal. All of my other jewellery is….” [white gold, yellow gold, etc.]

3. “It looks all tarnished.” (Usually a ring)

4. “I don’t like it.” (Perhaps it was a gift or inheritance . Unsuitable, not your taste and unlikely to be worn.)

Giving jewellery new life

There are many ways to re-purpose jewellery. You don’t always have to just scrap an item of jewellery. Taken from the above list, these are just a few suggestions.

1. (Obvious) Where possible, have the ring re-sized.

2. If you love the design, have it re-made in a metal you will wear.

3. Have the item cleaned and re-finished. It will look as good as new.

4. Put the item towards a new piece of jewellery you will wear. Offset the cost. For heirloom jewellery, the diamonds or gems at the heart of the piece could be set into a new item.

What can you do?

Think about it. It makes a lot of sense. When you read this, dig out your jewellery box. Look for that beautiful piece of jewellery that lies in the dark, unworn, unloved and consider giving it a new lease of life.

Send us a photograph, ask us a question, leave a comment…anything, but don’t close the lid of that jewellery box.

Mark Johnson

About Mark Johnson

Mark attended Liverpool University and went on to pursue a career in the diamond industry. After more than a decade working in polished diamonds, Mark moved to the Isle of Wight where he launched Serendipity Diamonds. He works most days from their busy Ryde showroom, photographing jewellery and writing for the Serendipity Diamonds website. Anyone interested can connect with Mark on Linkedin via the profile link.

Mark Johnson

About Mark Johnson

Mark attended Liverpool University and went on to pursue a career in the diamond industry. After more than a decade working in polished diamonds, Mark moved to the Isle of Wight where he launched Serendipity Diamonds. He works most days from their busy Ryde showroom, photographing jewellery and writing for the Serendipity Diamonds website. Anyone interested can connect with Mark on Linkedin via the profile link.