Diamond Wedding Rings and the Halo Setting

Diamond wedding ring for halo setting featured image

Choosing a Diamond Wedding Ring to Match the Halo Setting

Shaped diamond wedding ring fitting around a diamond halo engagement ring
Photograph shows halo engagement ring style R1D001S with matching shaped diamond wedding ring commission.

Explaining the Halo Setting

For jewellery newbies, we will firstly explain what the halo setting is. This style of ring provides a circular frame (usually) of diamonds, surrounding a central focus stone. This stone does not have to be diamond, but can be any one of a number of precious or semi-precious stone choices. The halo setting has actually been around since the early 1920’s. The style has recently began to gain favour and increase in popularity for engagement rings.

Shaping up for the Wedding Ring

Unless your halo ring has a corresponding (pre-designed) wedding ring style available, it is likely you will need a specially shaped wedding ring. The size, prominence and shape of the halo will usually define the basic outline of your wedding ring. By choosing the width to match your engagement ring band, there will be greater consistency across both rings.

Matching Diamonds

With any such commission, part of the design process involves making sure that any diamonds are matched for size, colour and clarity for greater consistency. Besides the metal type, the diamonds should be well matched. This in itself is a very good reason for a shaped wedding ring commission, rather than an “off-the-shelf ” solution. A good idea is usually to match the diamond shape. If your engagement ring has diamond shoulders, these can be beautifully balanced by aligning the diamonds across the wedding ring to line-up across both rings.

Look at the Setting Style

Matching metal is fairly obvious, so we will leave this aspect well alone. Choosing a setting style will ensure consistency and will make both rings appear more as a set. Although setting styles (eg. claw, channel, border and grain, flush set) can be mixed, sometimes the best results are obtained by mirroring your existing style.

Allow Time

Besides allowing for cost,  you will almost certainly need to allow time for the ring to be crafted. Most jewellers have variable timescales. Our typical timescale for any such commission tends to be around 4 weeks. Allowing longer provides you with peace of mind, and time to make changes if and when required.

On a further note, we present many of our previous commissions in our gallery, so perhaps take a look, come back and comment on what you see. and always feel free to contact us for further advice.

Mark Johnson

About Mark Johnson

Mark attended Liverpool University and went on to pursue a career in the diamond industry. After more than a decade working in polished diamonds, Mark moved to the Isle of Wight where he launched Serendipity Diamonds. He works most days from their busy Ryde showroom, photographing jewellery and writing for the Serendipity Diamonds website. Anyone interested can connect with Mark on Linkedin via the profile link.

Mark Johnson

About Mark Johnson

Mark attended Liverpool University and went on to pursue a career in the diamond industry. After more than a decade working in polished diamonds, Mark moved to the Isle of Wight where he launched Serendipity Diamonds. He works most days from their busy Ryde showroom, photographing jewellery and writing for the Serendipity Diamonds website. Anyone interested can connect with Mark on Linkedin via the profile link.