2 Carat Emerald Cut vs 2 Carat Princess Cut Diamonds

2 carat emerald cut and 2 carat princess cut photographed alongside each other

Actual photographs of 2 carat Emerald Cut alongside 2 carat Princess cut diamond

Both the Emerald cut, and Princess cut are two of the most popular diamond shapes chosen for engagement rings. The impact of a 2-carat diamond is undeniable. Each diamond shape gives a dramatically different look, so choose a diamond based on your requirements, keeping in mind the following points.

Emerald cuts are less sparkly

Emerald cut diamonds are faceted for fire, splitting light into colors of the spectrum. Step cut, Emerald cuts are polished with longitudinal facets offering less sparkle than a Princess cut. They are however no less attractive and are considered more subtle in their appearance.

2 carat emerald cut diamond

Close up of a 2 carat Emerald cut diamond

Along the finger – or across the finger?

Emerald cut diamonds can be set across the finger, or along the finger. The more unusual orientation is across the finger, positioned east to west. Traditionally, the diamond is set within a simple ring, positioned along the finger. There are many more styles available styled in this way. The image below shows the exceptional beauty of the ‘Ice’ 2 carats Emerald cut engagement ring.

Ice emerald cut 2 carat engagement ring

‘Ice’ engagement ring design

Princess cuts can be square or compass set

Princess cut engagement rings represent the second most popular style of diamond for engagement rings. Princess cut diamonds can be set square on, or turned for an entirely different look. The most popular position is square set—this will be the style seen in most jewelry store windows. The orientation matches the following photograph. If you are choosing a diamond to be compass set, ensure that your proportions are as perfectly square as possible. Any variation in length and width will be clearly visible. Very few Princess cut diamonds are perfectly square.

2 carat princess cut diamond photographed

Close up photograph showing a 2 carat Princess cut diamond.

Compass set ring designs feature corners oriented north-east-south-west, creating a very different look for the finished ring. Styled with complimentary V-shaped claws, the ‘Ignis’ engagement ring design is a striking example of a 2-carat compass set Princess cut engagement ring, with the added benefit of an open setting to reveal the diamond when viewed from the side.

Ignis 2 carat princess cut diamond engagement ring

‘Ignis’ engagement ring design

Princess cut diamonds are more forgiving of inclusions

Natural clarity characteristics (if present) are more visible within Emerald cut diamonds. The complex arrangement of facets on a Princess cut, and the smaller table size can help to disguise small inclusions within the diamond. Emerald cut diamonds tend to have a window-like appearance, revealing small inclusions. Such characteristics can appear multiplied by internally reflected features. One inclusion can be reflected several times within the same diamond. We recommend choosing a VS1 clarity 2 carat Emerald cut to ensure that any inclusions will not be visible to the naked eye.

For more help and guidance with 2-carat diamonds, please refer to our diamond concierge service, available for appointment based viewings, and for viewing diamonds by high-resolution photography for clients based further afield.

Mark Johnson

About Mark Johnson

Mark attended Liverpool University and went on to pursue a career in the diamond industry. After more than a decade working in polished diamonds, Mark moved to the Isle of Wight where he launched Serendipity Diamonds. He works most days from their busy Ryde showroom, photographing jewellery and writing for the Serendipity Diamonds website. Anyone interested can connect with Mark on Linkedin via the profile link.

Mark Johnson

About Mark Johnson

Mark attended Liverpool University and went on to pursue a career in the diamond industry. After more than a decade working in polished diamonds, Mark moved to the Isle of Wight where he launched Serendipity Diamonds. He works most days from their busy Ryde showroom, photographing jewellery and writing for the Serendipity Diamonds website. Anyone interested can connect with Mark on Linkedin via the profile link.