Diamond Key Pendants – Unlocking the Romance

Diamond key pendant

Diamond key pendants - example diagram based on our diamond heart key pendant PKEY001A Guide to Diamond Key Pendants

Diamond key pendants are a beautiful addition an existing range of diamond pendant designs. The concept of the key pendant evolved from the beauty of Antique keys featuring ornate scroll work. Modern key designs are hardly suitable. Ornate designs with traditional barrel-shaped shanks, give a wonderful source of inspiration for jewellery designers. There are almost as many key pendant designs as antique key styles. This in itself can give enormous scope for a bespoke design. As such, designs often exist as unique as the key itself. We have put together some advice on the features of some of the most elegant designs. Styling details that work wonderfully.

A – The Chain

The chain secures the pendant. Ensure the chain is the correct length – typically 18 inches to sit on the breast bone from an average size neck. The chain should ideally be fine, but not too flimsy since this secures an expensive item. Make sure the clasp of the chain is not too heavy or this will move around from the back of the neck sliding down to the pendant itself.

B – The Bail

Loose swinging bails offer a certain freedom of movement when suspended on the chain. The bail here is plain and discreet so that the focus is on the diamond key pendant design itself. The other alternative which is solid without this freedom of movement is the fixed bale which adjoins the item.

C – The Bow

Since this is usually the largest area of the key pendant, it is usually the most striking part of the design. Here we see a cut-out heart shape, bordered by micro-pavé diamonds. The carat weight amounts to 0.25cts across these small fully cut meleé diamonds. The bow can take on many strong design features. Popular styles of bow include oval, heart, round and Quatrefoil designs.

D – The Shoulder

The shoulder is an optional detail, but marks the division between the bow and the barrel. Here the shoulder is kept simple and in keeping with the feel and design of the piece. This small design feature is further reflected in the post referred to (see G below)

E – The Barrel

The barrel refers to the more cylindrical key shank styles. This design is flat on the underside and provides a nicely balanced length to width ratio across the design.

F – The Bit

Visually the key bit, balances out the weight of the bow and this is further balanced aesthetically with extra small diamonds pavé set into the metal.

G – The Post & Tip

The end point of the key is the tip. The tip is further enhanced by a post with the same design as the shoulder. This carries specific design detail across the entire key design.

Perfect Occasions

There are some wonderful opportunities for presenting this style of pendant. The following are just 3 suggestions for perfect occasions this pendant style will be perfect for.

1. A memorable birthday. Keys are typically given on a 21st Birthday.

2. A gift to commemorate moving in together, and a new home. (We could even create a bespoke design modelled on an existing key.)

3. A wedding gift. Elegant and finely crafted, key pendants are perfectly suited for a distinctive wedding day gift.

For more information, on this or any other available key designs, please feel free to comment below, contact us, or get in touch via our Facebook page.  Example referenced is our diamond heart key pendant PKEY001. 

Mark Johnson

About Mark Johnson

Mark attended Liverpool University and went on to pursue a career in the diamond industry. After more than a decade working in polished diamonds, Mark moved to the Isle of Wight where he launched Serendipity Diamonds. He works most days from their busy Ryde showroom, photographing jewellery and writing for the Serendipity Diamonds website. Anyone interested can connect with Mark on Linkedin via the profile link.

Mark Johnson

About Mark Johnson

Mark attended Liverpool University and went on to pursue a career in the diamond industry. After more than a decade working in polished diamonds, Mark moved to the Isle of Wight where he launched Serendipity Diamonds. He works most days from their busy Ryde showroom, photographing jewellery and writing for the Serendipity Diamonds website. Anyone interested can connect with Mark on Linkedin via the profile link.