What is a Rub Over Setting? Engagement Rings FAQ

Rub over setting for round brilliant engagement ring (R1D070)

What is a Rub Over Setting?

(Also known as the Bezel setting or Rubbed-Over Setting)

For today’s post, we are bringing attention to a beautiful engagement ring style, shown across the website by way of actual ring styles, and information on the rub-over setting. The Rub-Over setting is a design which is a close-runner for popularity as the traditional claw setting. It is probably less popular for retailers / manufacturers because diamond size needs to be precise, and there is far less tolerance for pre-designed settings. This is especially true where fancy shapes are concerns. In fact, where some fancy shapes (more diverse in measurement than rounds / Princess cuts) are concerned, settings are normally built around the diamond, ensuring the metal edge follows the diamond girdle.

Matching flat court profile wedding bandAs you can no doubt see from our main image, the Rub-Over setting holds the diamond in place within a continuous (see partial bezel settings for other instances) edge of metal. This can be cast or hand-made and most sizes and shapes of diamond can be set in this way. The edge of the metal almost appears to frame the diamond with very clean lines – a style that has become very popular for modern engagement ring styles.

The impact of this contemporary design only strengthens when a wedding ring is matched to the design, so that both band profiles mirror one another.

 

 

Mark Johnson

About Mark Johnson

Mark attended Liverpool University and went on to pursue a career in the diamond industry. After more than a decade working in polished diamonds, Mark moved to the Isle of Wight where he launched Serendipity Diamonds. He works most days from their busy Ryde showroom, photographing jewellery and writing for the Serendipity Diamonds website. Anyone interested can connect with Mark on Linkedin via the profile link.

Mark Johnson

About Mark Johnson

Mark attended Liverpool University and went on to pursue a career in the diamond industry. After more than a decade working in polished diamonds, Mark moved to the Isle of Wight where he launched Serendipity Diamonds. He works most days from their busy Ryde showroom, photographing jewellery and writing for the Serendipity Diamonds website. Anyone interested can connect with Mark on Linkedin via the profile link.