Finger Size – Small, Medium and Large Ring Sizes

Showing the most common engagement ring size for women in the UK

In-depth information and ring size conversion chart. 

Finger size systems

If you’re interested in getting a better idea of how finger size is measured – this post is for you.

In many parts of the World, different finger size systems exist, making the process a little tricky to understand.

Some systems use a number (US) or letter (UK) — we can work to either system, without needing to convert. Please just advise us whether you wish to order in the UK or US size.

Small, medium and large engagement rings and wedding rings

We can create almost every engagement ring and wedding ring design in most finger sizes. This includes finger sizes considered to be oversize and undersize—outside the norm for many jewellers.

Please note that if you do not see your finger size on our product pages, message or email us with your design and we’ll come straight back to you.

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HOW TO CLAIM YOUR FREE RING SIZER

Free uk ring sizer

 

If you would like a free ring sizer please visit any of our engagement ring or wedding ring pages and follow the link. We send out your free finger sizer from the UK straight away by First Class Mail.

Free-ring-sizer

International – Non-UK size systems?

Within the UK, letters are used, to denote finger size. The nearer the letter to the start of the alphabet, the smaller the finger size. Most jewellers measure size with a set of dummy rings which can be tried to find the correct size. Identifying size from an existing ring requires the size stick which carries markings to denote size.

Our size sticks carry UK, and International markings allowing easy accurate conversions to be made.

Ring size in a nutshell.

As a rule of thumb, the following sizes give you an idea of where some of the small, medium and larger UK finger sizes lie.

What is a small finger size?

Small finger sizes are finger size that are size F or G  through to size J.

Example of a small wedding ring finger size

Example of a small wedding ring finger size

What is a medium finger size?

A larger proportion of people have a finger size between size K and size O. Within the UK, L is one of the most popular finger sizes. Sizes within this range tend to be considered average finger sizes.

What is a large finger size?

Larger finger sizes tend to range from sizes P and Q upwards. Engagement rings and wedding rings are made in larger finger sizes, but sizes S and T  upwards are most popular for men’s wedding rings. Above size Z, sizes typically increase with +1, +2, +3 indicating incremental full sizes above Z. Keep in mind that engagement rings in larger sizes will sometimes be considered a bespoke ring design, made to order specially.

6 Factors that affect finger size

The following factors influence finger size and should be considered before you make your purchase.

1. Temperature – Depending on whether you are warm or cold, finger size can vary slightly. Colder weather normally results in rings feeling slightly looser.

2. Tissue fluid – Water levels within the tissues of the human body can affect the size of your finger. This can include particular times of the month falling in line with the female Menstrual Cycle. Pregnancy is also a factor.

3. Ring width – Wider bands tend to feel closer to the finger than narrower bands. This is because the ring is in contact with a greater surface area of the finger. If you are purchasing a wider band (engagement or wedding ring) you are wise to try on any ring of a similar width, or use a set of wider band ring sizers.

4. Knuckle size – Although knuckle size has little to do with finger size, the ring still needs to slide over the knuckle when placed on the finger, and when removed. If you have larger knuckles, there are suggestions for working around problems. Arthritis can be a significant problem which we allow for. Contact us for more advice on this particular subject.

5. Pregnancy – [See point 2 above]

6. Dominant hand – Please keep in mind that the dominant hand can be upto 2 finger sizes larger than the other hand. If you are basing her size on a ring fitted to the third finger of her dominant right hand, then you might want to consider at least one size smaller for a left (non-dominant) engagement ring finger.

Most effective method of discovering your finger size

Although we send out a free ring sizer (see our product pages) we recommend obtaining your finger size during a visit to an experienced jeweller. Within a short space of time, you will judge how certain sizes feel.

How should a wedding ring feel on the finger?

Your wedding ring should feel snug without discomfort. When you shake your hand it should remain firmly in place. It should not easily turn on the finger. A light tug on the ring should not remove it from the finger. Stretch out your finger with a firm grip on the wedding ring and pull – your wedding ring should now come off the finger without too much effort (perhaps just a gentle waggle.)

Seeing a ridge on your wedding ring finger

If you’re seeing a ridge on your wedding ring finger, this is perfectly normal. Most wedding rings cause a smooth depression below the wedding ring. This forms a natural indent into which your wedding ring rests. If your wedding ring causes discomfort, irritation, redness or swelling we recommend removing the ring and re-assessing finger size.

 

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Mark Johnson

About Mark Johnson

Mark co-founded Serendipity Diamonds in 2007 after 20 years working with loose diamonds and jewellery. Mark is a keen jewellery and gemstone photographer, blogger and content writer. He works alongside a small team in their Ryde showroom and spends his spare time working on jewellery photography projects and with his two young children. I confirm the subscription of this blog to the Paperblog service under the username ukmarkj

Mark Johnson

About Mark Johnson

Mark co-founded Serendipity Diamonds in 2007 after 20 years working with loose diamonds and jewellery. Mark is a keen jewellery and gemstone photographer, blogger and content writer. He works alongside a small team in their Ryde showroom and spends his spare time working on jewellery photography projects and with his two young children. I confirm the subscription of this blog to the Paperblog service under the username ukmarkj