How Big is a 1 Carat Diamond Ring?

1-Carat-Tiffany-Engagement-Ring
Photograph showing a 1 carat diamond ring in the hand to show scale.

How to show the size of a 1 carat diamond ring – in context.

The question of how big a 1 carat diamond ring is, depends on a few factors. Firstly is the diamond ring a single stone? Perhaps the carat weight is a total weight of more than one diamond? What shape is the diamond?

A diamond cluster, or three stone ring (1 carat total) will be a very different size to a single diamond ring (solitaire.) The shape will also affect the physical size. Take for example the Marquise cut of diamond, this stone shape has a longer axis compared to the width, and provides a completely different ratio of size to the round brilliant cut featured here.

Gaining a better idea of the physical size of a diamond ring is much easier when a ring is seen in the flesh. Where this is not possible photographs are a great alternative. The problem here comes from a lack of context with most photographs. When we shoot product images, the last thing we want is to put additional objects alongside to show scale. It tends to detract from the beauty of the photograph.

An alternative that works well, involves the ring being held, or shown on the finger. The contrast in flesh tone, is very helpful to buyers, yet the recognisable size of a finger or hand allows scale to be appreciated. Today’s image shows R1D077 set with a 1 carat diamond in 18ct Yellow and White Gold.

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Mark Johnson

About Mark Johnson

Mark attended Liverpool University and went on to pursue a career in the diamond industry. After more than a decade working in polished diamonds, Mark moved to the Isle of Wight where he launched Serendipity Diamonds. He works most days from their busy Ryde showroom, photographing jewellery and writing for the Serendipity Diamonds website. Anyone interested can connect with Mark on Linkedin via the profile link.

Mark Johnson

About Mark Johnson

Mark attended Liverpool University and went on to pursue a career in the diamond industry. After more than a decade working in polished diamonds, Mark moved to the Isle of Wight where he launched Serendipity Diamonds. He works most days from their busy Ryde showroom, photographing jewellery and writing for the Serendipity Diamonds website. Anyone interested can connect with Mark on Linkedin via the profile link.