Wrap Around Engagement Rings

Wrap around engagement ring

Wrap Around Engagement RingsWrap around engagement rings can take the form of two very different styles. Much falls upon interpretation of the term ‘Wrap around.’ Since the band of any ring literally wraps around the finger, interpretation is usually based upon the setting itself – how this wraps around and holds the diamond in place. In the very simplest claw styles of setting, the fine wire claws can literally twist around the diamond, like hands wrapping around the edge of the stone. We have referred to such twist style previously, with many alternatives currently available, either by way of four, or six claws most being most prevalent. Here we see ring design R1D002, a modern day classic design – a one part ring style with shoulders flowing into the wrap-around claws securing the diamond around the girdle.

Wrap around setting with part bezel designOur next ring style, we will talk briefly about in today’s blog is the bezel setting. The full bezel setting wraps entirely around the diamond, whereas the partial bezel covers the diamond only around part of the diamond. This might be a small section of the circumference, or this can be of greater extent – potentially around the majority of the diamond edge. Part bezel settings covering a mere half of the diamond usually require an opposing claw to prevent the diamond from coming away from the ring – a necessity in securing the stone within the design. The full bezel setting in contrast to this, provides much greater security for the diamond. Metal is pushed over the outer edge of the stone. Security is provided with two main advantages – firstly the edge of the diamond is protected from chipping. Although a blow to the edge of the setting may ultimately damage the setting, the diamond is more likely to be unharmed. Secondly, since the diamond is held continuously around the edge of the diamond,  exctraction of the diamond (more specifically loss) is less likely. Referenced left, is part bezel style R1D010B with opposing retaining claw.

Mark Johnson

About Mark Johnson

Mark co-founded Serendipity Diamonds in 2007 after 20 years working with loose diamonds and jewellery. Mark is a keen jewellery and gemstone photographer, blogger and content writer. He works alongside a small team in their Ryde showroom and spends his spare time working on jewellery photography projects and with his two young children.

Mark Johnson

About Mark Johnson

Mark co-founded Serendipity Diamonds in 2007 after 20 years working with loose diamonds and jewellery. Mark is a keen jewellery and gemstone photographer, blogger and content writer. He works alongside a small team in their Ryde showroom and spends his spare time working on jewellery photography projects and with his two young children.