925 Gold Stamp? – Popular Hallmarks for Jewellery and Precious Metals

925 Stamp appearing on coin

Is there such as thing as a 925 Gold stamp?

We are frequently asked to identify “Gold” jewellery featuring a 925 Gold stamp. When purchasing an item of unknown origin, there is sometimes uncertainty about the composition of an item of jewellery.  As a result, buyers look towards markings on items of jewellery. Within the UK, most jewellery has a hallmark stamped on the item. Furthermore, hallmarks reveal a set of unique characters. A number sometimes denotes the composition of the metal.

Does the 925 stamp actually mean your jewellery is Gold?

925 is usually used to represent Silver. There is a possibility that a suspected 925 stamp is actually 925 Silver, plated to give the effect of Gold. If the item of precious metal jewellery feels light, or if there is obvious discolouration to the colour, the item could indeed by Silver, and plated.

What do numbers typically mean when applied to jewellery?

There are different reasons why an item of jewellery features a number stamped onto the piece. Here are a few explanations.

Stamped numbers might represent the purity of the precious metal

A stamped number within the hallmark tells you how fine, or what quality, the metal is, as well as indicating the metal type. This numerical format was introduced in 1999 and shows the precious metal content of the article, expressed in parts per thousand. We mark a piece to the lowest standard of alloy content, so it guarantees that the quality of the article is no less than the fineness indicated. [Assay Office London]

925 Gold stamp or 925 Silver stamp?

Sterling Silver stamped 925 sometimes mistaken for a Gold stamp

The shape of a surrounding shield indicates the metal type. In the Gold Fineness mark, 375 is 9 carat, 585 is 14 carat, 750 is 18 carat and 916 is 22 carat. In the Silver Fineness mark, 925 is Sterling and 958 is Britannia Silver.

A number might represent a gemstone carat weight

Some items of gemstone jewellery include the weight of a diamond or gemstone stamped into the ring. For example, 0.50 might denote a total diamond weight representing a half carat of diamonds.

Numbers might represent a serial number for a jewellery design

Some jewellery manufacturers apply a number to represent a specific jewellery design. When items are made in quantities, a number could represent a specific jewellery code or pattern for the design.

How to be 100% certain that your jewellery is Gold

If you are adamant that your item of jewellery is Gold, we would recommend sending your jewellery to an organisation such as Safeguard at the Assay Office in Birmingham. They will test and verify your metal to be 100% certain.

You can read more about specific markings on jewellery via documentation provided by the various Assay Offices located in the UK.

Mark Johnson

About Mark Johnson

Mark attended Liverpool University and went on to pursue a career in the diamond industry. After more than a decade working in polished diamonds, Mark moved to the Isle of Wight where he launched Serendipity Diamonds. He works most days from their busy Ryde showroom, photographing jewellery and writing for the Serendipity Diamonds website. Anyone interested can connect with Mark on Linkedin via the profile link.

Mark Johnson

About Mark Johnson

Mark attended Liverpool University and went on to pursue a career in the diamond industry. After more than a decade working in polished diamonds, Mark moved to the Isle of Wight where he launched Serendipity Diamonds. He works most days from their busy Ryde showroom, photographing jewellery and writing for the Serendipity Diamonds website. Anyone interested can connect with Mark on Linkedin via the profile link.