What is a Briolette Diamond? Unusual Diamond Cuts Uncovered

What are Briolette Diamonds?

Briolette diamonds are drop-shaped diamonds featuring triangular or diamond-shaped facets. Many examples include fine drill holes to support wire thread and the addition of a small metal cap. This makes the Briolette an excellent choice for diamond drop earrings and pendants, acting as a ‘diamond bead,’ opposite to the conventional methods of diamond setting.

Briolette diamonds styled as pear-shaped diamonds

A selection of Briolette style diamonds, in drop shapes. 

Are Briolettes more expensive?

This diamond cut will demand a higher price on account of its rarity. Only specialist diamond suppliers feature Briolettes within their inventories. Colours range from white, through to brown and yellow.

Example Briolette diamond necklace

Photo credit Chip Clark / SquareMoose

Briolette diamonds in Antique jewellery

Besides earrings, Briolettes feature in Antique jewellery. They are especially suited to Tiaras. Moving freely, their reflective movement adds drama to jewellery. The most famous example is probably the ‘Briolette of India’ weighing in at 90.38 carats. Because this diamond shape suspends from a wire thread, there is a similarity to the appearance of Chandelier crystals.

 

 

Mark Johnson

About Mark Johnson

Mark attended Liverpool University and went on to pursue a career in the diamond industry. After more than a decade working in polished diamonds, Mark moved to the Isle of Wight where he launched Serendipity Diamonds. He works most days from their busy Ryde showroom, photographing jewellery and writing for the Serendipity Diamonds website. Anyone interested can connect with Mark on Linkedin via the profile link.

Mark Johnson

About Mark Johnson

Mark attended Liverpool University and went on to pursue a career in the diamond industry. After more than a decade working in polished diamonds, Mark moved to the Isle of Wight where he launched Serendipity Diamonds. He works most days from their busy Ryde showroom, photographing jewellery and writing for the Serendipity Diamonds website. Anyone interested can connect with Mark on Linkedin via the profile link.