Pear Shaped Diamonds Pros Cons – Choosing Your Perfect Stone

F colour pear shaped diamond

Pear shaped diamonds pros cons. 0.91cts GIA certified Pear shaped diamond from a recent commission, photographed for client ahead of manufacture.

Pear Shaped Diamonds Pros and Cons

Pear shaped diamonds are also known as pear modified brilliant cut diamonds. They vary considerably in their shape and proportion. Over the last decade we have seen a staggering diversity of diamonds. Many vary considerably in shape.  Some pear shaped diamonds are long, some are thin. Some appear square shouldered and others almost egg-shaped. For this reason, we introduced the diamond concierge service to help clients view diamonds. Photography reveals the aesthetic proportions of a beautiful diamond. It filters out poorly made diamonds. Unfortunately the latter of these are often purchased due to a lower price. Compromising the appearance of the finished piece of jewellery.

Comparison – Good Pear Shape vs Bad Pear Shape

The following photographs show two pear-shaped diamonds. Both have similar specifications. The most obvious difference can only be appreciated when the diamond is viewed in person or by photograph.

Poorly made Pear Shaped Diamond. 

Pear shaped diamonds may appear too long or too broad in proportions. A damaged tip can be re-polished. This can result in an egg shaped appearance. An example is provided below.

Egg shaped diamond Pear shape

Poorly cut pear shaped diamond appearing almost egg-shaped in comparison to better cut diamond.

Favoured Pear Shaped Diamond Proportions

The next photograph shows a more favourable shape. Observe the rounded shape. It has more visually pleasing proportions, tapering to a point. The shape is clearly defined. The result is a beautifully shaped engagement ring or diamond pendant.

Pear shaped diamonds pros cons
Nicely cut pear shaped diamond. Good proportions and a defined shape. Clearly visible point. Both make this a much better contender for a pear shaped engagement ring.

Pear Shaped Diamonds Pros Cons

There are certain key elements to watch out for when purchasing your pear shaped diamond. The following notes will assist you in finding the best stone for your budget. Avoid the pitfalls of buying a cheap diamond that falls short of your expectations.

Pro – Cheaper price

Pear shaped diamonds are priced more competitively than round brilliant cut diamonds. For this reason they represent a clever choice for getting value for money.

Con – Reduced design choice

Compared to the modern round brilliant cut and princess cut, there are fewer jewellery designs available for pear shaped diamonds.

Con – Vulnerable tip 

The weakest part of a pear shaped diamond is the tip or point. We can set diamonds purchased via Serendipity into many ring styles including bespoke designs and we cover all setting work for our own diamonds to insure against potential breakage.

Pro – Perfect for pendants and earrings

The droplet shape of the pear makes it an ideal choice for pendants and earrings.

Pro – Slimming choice for an engagement ring

Pear shaped diamonds point along a vertical axis drawing the eye along the diamond and along the finger, making the finger appear longer.

Con – Exaggerated bow-tie effect within some diamonds

Watch out for pronounced dark facets within some pear shaped diamonds. Marquise cut and pear shaped diamonds often show a dark ‘bow-tie’ effect within the diamond, but this can appear more noticeable in some diamonds.

View an assortment of different ring styles available for the pear shaped diamond, on our main website section.

Mark Johnson

About Mark Johnson

Mark attended Liverpool University and went on to pursue a career in the diamond industry. After more than a decade working in polished diamonds, Mark moved to the Isle of Wight where he launched Serendipity Diamonds. He works most days from their busy Ryde showroom, photographing jewellery and writing for the Serendipity Diamonds website.

Mark Johnson

About Mark Johnson

Mark attended Liverpool University and went on to pursue a career in the diamond industry. After more than a decade working in polished diamonds, Mark moved to the Isle of Wight where he launched Serendipity Diamonds. He works most days from their busy Ryde showroom, photographing jewellery and writing for the Serendipity Diamonds website.