What is the Rex Setting? – Engagement Rings in Focus

The Rex Claw Setting

Amongst the many popular setting styles adopted for diamond rings, the Rex setting remains a broad but popular style. But what exactly is a Rex setting?

Definition of a Rex Setting

Very simply, the Rex Setting style bases itself upon the design of a crown. The name Rex comes from the Latin for ‘King’ or ‘Reigning Sovereign’ but probably closer to ‘Crowned Head’ which is more in context here. This is a style of claw setting that holds a diamond, based on the design of a crown. The style is best represented by the traditional six or even eight claw settings. The setting of a ring sits over the band or shank and is responsible for securing the diamond. The claws or prongs of the Rex setting surround the diamond at equal distances around the stone. Settings are made in any metal and the design can vary from very simple styles, to more elaborate designs.

Rex Setting - adopted by the six claw Tiffany style engagement ring of R1D077
R1D077 best representing the six claw Rex setting. A very popular solitaire setting in the Tiffany style.

Single Stone or Three Stone Rex

The most popular styles include one stone (solitaire) or three stone (Trilogy) designs. The three stone designs are typically graduated. This is probably the most popular style of ring for a more traditional feel, mounted on a band that often has tapering shoulders to give a balanced look. We have referenced R1D077 by way of example. This is a beautiful six claw design, which holds a round brilliant cut diamond. The setting has the distinctive crown style which makes the Rex claw setting so easy to recognise. The base of the setting is typically narrower than the flared claws which rise to reach around the edges of the diamond. The most popular example of this style is the Tiffany Setting, introduced by Tiffany & Co. to give a very simple and effective Platinum setting for a diamond.

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Mark Johnson

About Mark Johnson

Mark attended Liverpool University and went on to pursue a career in the diamond industry. After more than a decade working in polished diamonds, Mark moved to the Isle of Wight where he launched Serendipity Diamonds. He works most days from their busy Ryde showroom, photographing jewellery and writing for the Serendipity Diamonds website. Anyone interested can connect with Mark on Linkedin via the profile link.

Mark Johnson

About Mark Johnson

Mark attended Liverpool University and went on to pursue a career in the diamond industry. After more than a decade working in polished diamonds, Mark moved to the Isle of Wight where he launched Serendipity Diamonds. He works most days from their busy Ryde showroom, photographing jewellery and writing for the Serendipity Diamonds website. Anyone interested can connect with Mark on Linkedin via the profile link.