Pink Diamonds : A Beginners Guide to Buying a Pink Diamond

Rough pink diamonds

What are pink diamonds?

Natural pink diamonds are sought after by diamond collectors, jewellery lovers and gemstone connoisseurs. Prized for their beauty and rarity, pink diamonds evoke a true feeling of passion and romance. But rarity comes with a price. Only a small number of people purchase pink diamonds owing to reasons of both cost and availability.

The colour of pink diamonds occurs because of Lattice defects—imperfections in the arrangement of the atoms within the diamond crystal. These defects sometimes cause pink graining in the diamond crystal. The intensity of the color depends on the amount of pink graining present. Pink diamonds are prized for the intensity of colour. The following descriptions are used to describe the depth of colour.

Both rarity and value increase from faint towards fancy deep.

Fancy Deep Pink
Fancy Dark Pink
Fancy Vivid Pink
Fancy Intense Pink
Fancy Pink
Fancy Light Pink
Light Pink
Very Light Pink
Faint Pink

Many pink diamonds have another colour—a modifier present. This gives the diamond a characteristic colour. Examples include orange-pink and purplish-pink. Pink diamonds with no modifier are rarer by comparison.

Where do most pink diamonds originate?

Each year, only a handful of pink diamonds are discovered. Over 90 percent of the World’s pink diamonds come from Australia’s Argyle mine. Each diamond is tracked from the mine to market ensuring full traceability for each diamond mined.

Pink diamonds and the importance of cut

Pink diamonds take around 3-4 times longer to cut than white diamonds. Surprisingly, pink colouration can be lost when a pink diamond is cut. Many pink diamonds lack an intense pink colour. Furthermore, a very pale pink can be intensified by careful consideration of both the cut and diamond shape chosen.

Natural pink diamond in rough form

Natural rough pink diamond. Image courtesy of Petra Diamonds.

The similarity between brown and pink diamonds

Brown diamonds are plentiful, compared to pink diamonds. They account for most of the diamonds unearthed from the Argyle Mine. Interestingly, the same lattice defects account for the brown or pink colour within diamonds. Colour grading for natural pink diamonds

Pink diamonds vs pink sapphires

Pink sapphires make an excellent, more affordable alternative for most people. Durable, affordable and intensely colour, pink sapphires exist in many shapes, sizes and hues to suit most tastes. Many buyers requesting a pink diamond fail to realise the incredible price tag associated with a natural pink diamond.

Popular alternatives to pink diamonds

Besides pink sapphires, Morganite offers a further alternative to a pink diamond. Morganite is available in many shapes, sizes and shades. Examples include the popular peachy pink colour as seen in our cushion-cut example below.

Morganite makes a great alternative to a pink diamond

Morganite makes a beautiful alternative to a pink diamond

Buyer beware – avoid disappointment when buying a pink diamond.

Many of the pink diamonds sold without being seen, lack the intensity of colour desired by the buyer. A very pale pink diamond can lose all trace of colour when set into an engagement ring.

But it says it’s pink on my diamond certificate!!!

Do you want a diamond that is pink only on your diamond certificate? A diamond can be classified as faint pink, without having a noticeable pink colour. For this reason, we strongly recommend visiting your jeweller to view the diamond. Observe the diamond unset and held loosely on your chosen ring mount. This will enable you to see how visible the colour is before the diamond is set into the ring.

It’s not about the clarity

Many pink diamonds show noticeable inclusions within the diamond. Remember that when it comes to fancy colour, clarity is less of a consideration. Some of the most expensive diamonds have visible inclusions. Naturally, the price will be far higher for an intense pink diamond with no visible characteristics.

Mark Johnson

About Mark Johnson

Mark attended Liverpool University and went on to pursue a career in the diamond industry. After more than a decade working in polished diamonds, Mark moved to the Isle of Wight where he launched Serendipity Diamonds. He works most days from their busy Ryde showroom, photographing jewellery and writing for the Serendipity Diamonds website. Anyone interested can connect with Mark on Linkedin via the profile link.

Mark Johnson

About Mark Johnson

Mark attended Liverpool University and went on to pursue a career in the diamond industry. After more than a decade working in polished diamonds, Mark moved to the Isle of Wight where he launched Serendipity Diamonds. He works most days from their busy Ryde showroom, photographing jewellery and writing for the Serendipity Diamonds website. Anyone interested can connect with Mark on Linkedin via the profile link.